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STEM Careers

What is the best college for you?

The published lists of best colleges in the nation are relatively unchanged from year to year—at the top are the prestigious, expensive, often research-heavy and well-endowed institutions, the ones that many aspire to and that all others are often compared to. But does the best college for you necessarily rank high on the list? Wouldn’t it be better to ask which college education would have the gr...
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STEM in the real world

How do modern successful companies prepare for future workforce needs? How do they guarantee that there will be a steady pipeline of qualified candidates ready to fill the burgeoning demand for technically trained individuals? If you’re the Ford Motor Company, you start an initiative called Next Generation Learning to bring real-world problems into the classroom, problems that demand collaboration...
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The STEM-Autism Connection

Statistically, between 80% and 90% of those on the autism spectrum are unemployed. The social and financial costs of such a large number are huge. The work you do occupies almost a third of your life and is a large part of who you are. Those who are unemployed, particularly those who are chronically unemployed, don’t have an answer to the question, “What do you do?” That whole part of their lives ...
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STEM and SPED

It is now regarded as a truism that many of those with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) who are at the upper end of the spectrum have specific talents and abilities that lend themselves particularly well to STEM pursuits. It is equally true that those with an ASD thrive when provided with supports that mitigate their weaknesses, and with an education that takes into account their specific learnin...
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Putting STEM to work

“When people think of an industrial factory, they think dark, dirty and heavy lifting and it’s not that way anymore…People don’t understand that…it’s meant for somebody with higher analytical skills and higher troubleshooting abilities [as well as for somebody] who can turn a wrench.” http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/01/12/apprenticeships-could-provide-a-pathway-to-the-middle-class?int=a4...
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The Hour of Code is upon us!

The week beginning December 8th is being celebrated as Computer Science week, with schools nation-wide being encouraged to spend at least an hour coding. Village Glen has joined the movement and on both the Sherman Oaks and the Culver City campuses will be among tens of thousands of schools promoting at least an hour of code in all of their classes. Why the emphasis? In 25 states, computer science...
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STEM, education, and a secure career

How do you get a job in the technology industry without a college degree? In the November 5th online issue of Bloomberg Businessweek, (http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-11-05/how-to-get-a-job-in-the-technology-industry-without-a-college-degree ) there is an interesting article which responds to just that question. This should allay some concerns that high-demand STEM careers are precluded ...
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Data in a digital age

We are awash in a sea of data. When you accessed your smart phone to navigate from home, your location and destination were tracked by satellite. When you bought something online, or ran a search as part of your research, those data were recorded. That exponentially growing pile of data includes medical records, financial records, educational records, and criminal records, to name but a few. Consi...
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STEM, Autism, High School and beyond

A new survey in Utah of students with IEPs who left school in 2011 found that 19% were neither in school nor employed one year after graduating. The numbers for those on the autism spectrum are considerably higher: Paul Shattuck of Drexel University claims that 35% of those on the spectrum between 19 and 23 have never had a job or had post-secondary education. How do we defend against such numbers...
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The Advantage of Autism

Thorkil Sonne is not a household name. Nevertheless, he is a pioneer in changing the perception that the world has of those on the spectrum. Sonne, a Dane, was the technical director of a software company when he noticed that his son, who is on the spectrum, had a keen eye for detail, great persistence, and a phenomenal memory. What Sonne noticed is that his son had just the skills that his compan...
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